From the editors
FOREWORD

DESTINATION
Aleksandr Sologubov
CULTURE IN A "FOREIGN" SPACE: AN INTRODUCTION
Ivan Chechot
TO GENIUS LOCI KALININGRAD AND KOENIGSBERG
Wolfgang Eichwede
KALININGRAD IN THE YEAR 2020 - A NOT QUITE FICTITIOUS CONVERSATION
Aleksandr Sologubov
DESTINATION - KALININGRAD

PHRASE BOOK
Aleksandr Sologubov
FROM KALININGRAD DICTIONARY

MAP OF THE CITY
Anatolii Bakhtin
UGLY KOENIGSBERG
Elena Gladkova
FORMA URBIS. SYMBOLIC PARALLELS
Valery Orlov
IN OR OUT

SOUTHERN STATION
Ivan Chechot
THE RAILWAY STATION AND ENTRANCE TO THE CITY OF KALININGRAD

CROSSROADS
Aleksandr Popadin
BINARY STATES OF "K" CITY
Eugeny Umansky, Karpenko-Karpenko
KATYANASTYA

IN THE CENTER
Andrei Monastyrsky, Sabina Haensgen
EMPTY CENTER K.
Pavel Nastin
COURTYARD-WELL

COMMUNICATIONS
Artem Advokat
GRAFFITI
Elena Tsvetaeva
FOLK GRAFFITI
Marek Wolodzko
FOLLOWING SILENT WORDS
FA+ (Ingrid Falk & Gustavo Aguerre)
THE MYTHICAL FOUNDATION OF KALININGRAD
Aleksandr Sologubov
MICROTOPONYMY

PRETERITION: KNEIPHOF ISLAND
Aleksandr Sologubov
THE CATHEDRAL
Aleksandr Popadin
ERECTING BRIDGES
Ivan Chechot
THE BRIDGES AND "THE PREGEL'S ODOR"
John Craig Freeman, Greg Ulmer
IMAGING KALININGRAD: THE SEVEN BRIGES OF KOENIGSBERG

STOA KANTIANA
Anatolii Bakhtin
FORGOTTEN KANT AND THE KANT-BRAND IN KOENIGSBERG
Aleksandr Sologubov
KANT
Olga Lopukhova
KANT'S TOMB
Erika Wolf
KANT'S BRIDES: A READYMADE PHOTOGRAPHIC CHRONOTOPE
Ivan Chechot
THE CATHEDRAL AND KANT FOR EVERYONE, OR IS GOD FEARSOME WITHOUT MORAL

THE CASTLE OF SOVIETS
Aleksandr Sologubov
THE ROYAL CASTLE
Igor Sacharov-Ross
WINE CELLAR
Dali Rust
A WHITE SEAGULL ABOVE THE CITY: THE SYMBOLS OF THE OLD NEW CITY
Joanna Sandell
WRITING OF DREAMS
RAKETA
LIGHT UP DOM SOVETOV
Aleksandr Sologubov
THE HOUSE OF SOVIETS

GERMANS
Ilya Dementiev
THE MOST PROFOUND SECRET OF ONE KOENIGSBERG LAWYER: HOFFMANN
KudaBegutSobaki
A LEGEND ABOUT FIVE LITTLE ULRICHEN AND FERRYMAN ANDRE

Peter Wunsch
KOENIGSBERG-KALININGRAD. THE TASTE OF MARZIPAN
Aleksandr Sologubov
THE COUNTRY OF PENSIONERS - OR THE GERMANS
Martin Huettel
QWERTZ

MOSCOW PERSPECTIVE
Olga Sezneva
CONCRETE ELEMENTS OF KALININGRAD
Agnieszka Wolodzko
HABITATION UNITS
Werner Moeller
THE UNDREAMED OF CITY
Oleg Vasiutin
TOWN PLANNING MATHEMATICS
Mark Borozna
MOSKOVSKII PROSPECT & THE SHADOWS AROUND ALTSTADT

OUR TOWER Ivan Chechot
KRONPRINZ
Elena Tsvetaeva
THE TOWER-REDAN "KRONPRINZ"
THE KRONPRINZ TOWER. Projects for the National Centre for Contemporary Arts by Students of the Institute for Theory and Design in Architecture (Braunschweig, Germany)
OUR PRIDE
Aleksandr Sologubov
AMBER
Aleksandr Sologubov
ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES
Ivan Chechot
THE AMBER ROOM

BASTIONS
Avenir Ovsyanov
BASTIONS IN DIAMONDS AND EMERALDS
Rostan Tavasiev
LITTLE BRICKS

THE MARKET
Ivan Chechot
THE HOUSE OF MACHINERY: THE RECONSTRACTION AND EXPLOITATION OF THE POPULATION

V.I.P. (Very Interesting Person)
Elena Tsvetaeva
SERGEI TIMOFEEVICH

PLACE OF EXECUTION
Bert Hoppe
TRACES OF A VIRTUAL HISTORY IN A VERY REAL CITY

CSC ROC
Aleksandr Sologubov
CHRIST THE SAVIOR CATHEDRAL

TRAM
Aleksandr Sologubov
LIFE AND EGGS (A sketch about trams)
SKART
LUCKY TICKET

MEETING POINT
Aleksandr Popadin
THE BULLS
Ivan Chechot
GAUL'S FOUNTAIN
Ivan Chechot
A STROLL THROUGH THE CENTER
Aleksandr Popadin
IN THE FLOW: FOUNTAIN SEASON
Aleksandr Popadin
NINE
Elena Tsygankova
WILD WEST OF RUSSIA

THE ZOO
Irina Kozhevnikova
ZOO
Ingeborg Strobl
ANIMALS IN KALININGRAD AND A MOSAIC
Elena Tsvetaeva
KOENIGSBERG CATS

MEMENTO MORE
Avenir Ovsianov
KOENIGSBERG'S SPIRITUAL HERITAGE IN TONS, ITEMS AND SACKS. From the history of lost and found cultural heritage
Aleksandr Sologubov
KALININ PARK
Aleksandr Popadin
WE ALL ARE GOING TO BE THERE
Aleksandr Sologubov
MONUMENTS
Irina Kozhevnikova
MONUMENT TO 1200 GUARDSMEN IN KALININGRAD
Roger Palmer
BRIEF MEMORIALS

MATTER AND SPIRIT
Aleksandr Sologubov
MYSTICISM
Aleksandr Popadin
FRAGMENT OF A SYMPHONY FOR SLOW READING: IVANOV AND HIS SURROUNDINGS
Evgenii Umanskii
ATTIC OF RECOGNITION
Aleksandr Sologubov
STOVES
Dmitrii Vyshemirskii
MAN AND WOMAN
Lana Vyshemirskaya
THE SMALL SCULPTURE "GIRL"

ON THE STREET
Evgenii Umanskii
CHANUKAH
Aleksandr Popadin
CUBIC PAVEMENT
Igor Isaev, Dmitrii Demidenko
SEWER HATCHES
Aleksandr Popadin
THE FIRE HYDRANT
Irina Kozhevnikova
TRADITIONS
Kalle Brolin, Kristina Muntzing
POTENTIAL PLACE

Aleksandr Popadin
THE WATERFALL HERACLES' BOLT

V.I.P. (Very Interesting Person)
Manuela
NATASHA POTERYASHINA. Inteview

ATMOSPHERE
Aleksandr Sologubov
TO BE IN THE MOOD FOR PACKING
Aleksandr Popadin
ALL-WEATHER KALININGRADIANS
Dmitrii Bulatov, Pavel Savel'ev
ACEPHALUS: OPTICAL MODELS
Mark Borozna
LIGHT THE CRYSTALS OF KALININGRAD!

THE HARBOR
Evgenii Kazannik
PORT
Aleksandr Ponomarev
THE GATES

SUBURBS
Avenir Ovsyanov
THE BRIDGE THAT THE "RUSSIANS COULDN'T PULL DOWN"
Elena Tsvetaeva
THE ROAD TO BERLIN: FROM EPIC TO BANAL. Interview with Valerii Bugrov
Aleksandr Popadin
HOAR-STONES AND BOUNDARY SYMBOLS
Aleksandr Popadin
MUSCOVITES ARE HANGING
Anders Kreuger
BEFORE THE CITY




Excavations at the Royal Castle site. Photo by D. Vyshemirskii, 2005

KOENIGSBERG'S SPIRITUAL HERITAGE IN TONS, ITEMS AND SACKS

From the history of lost and found cultural heritage


Avenir Ovsianov / Kaliningrad, Russia


Koenigsberg was not only the capital of East Prussia, but also its main museum town. The city possessed numerous art collections, including those in the Order Castle, the Wrangel Tower Treasury, Albertina University, the Museum of Arts and Crafts, the Academy of Arts, the State amber manufacturer, the Cathedral on Kneiphof Island, and in various churches. Numerous mansions, town and village churches, private museums and amber workshops also possessed cultural valuables.

Where are they today? What happened to the famous museums, libraries, and art collections? Unfortunately, there is no definitive answer, and the issue needs thorough study.

Certainly, we may assume that all the museum exhibits were transported to central parts of Germany before the war. But analysis of present day holdings from East Prussian museums in Duisburg, Luneburg, Gottingen and others towns, and their comparison with Koenigsberg's pre-war catalogues shows that there are no major Koenigsberg art collections there.

Naturally, there were losses during the bombings of storage places and during transportation. Other artworks were stolen and turned out to be in private collections. But where is the rest of the treasure?

Documents, which are available at the Department on the Search for Cultural Valuables at the Science and Production Center on the Preservation and Use of Monuments of History and Culture, enable us to partially answer this question and to even track collections of art, some monuments and book collections.

Tracing cultural valuables is not easy, due to the post-war custom of registering pieces of national heritage in tons, pieces, rolls, and truckloads. Here are some examples:

In the summer of 1945 paintings and drawings by Renaissance artists (Michelangelo, Justi, Cambiaso, Albani and others) were removed from the Koenigsberg Academy of Arts and taken to the east. The deed of conveyance to the Pushkin State Museum in Moscow (where they are presently stored, editor's note) only provides the number of artworks, 139.

A tragic fate befell cultural valuables that were concentrated in the Order Castle in Koenigsberg. Artworks that were not hidden in the cellars or transported to dugouts, fortresses and mansions were destroyed during bombing by Anglo-American Aviation Forces. The exhibits of the Minsk Museum - 18th century paintings, porcelain manufactured in St Petersburg and Berlin, antique furniture, and Soviet artworks were also destroyed in flames. In those days part of the Amber Room was destroyed as well. The exhibits of the Prussian Museum, which had been transported to Fortress 3, were looted during the summer of 1945. Only a few samples that did not attract the attention of looters were discovered hidden in the cellars in 1999-2001. A significant quantity of valuables was found in the castle cellars during its demolition during the 1950s-1970s.

A significant amount of cultural valuables was found in the summer of 1945 by Professor A. Brusov, a staff member of the Historical Museum and a member of the brigade for Cultural Organization Affairs of the Council of People's Commissars RSFSR. All of these valuables were packed into 60 boxes. 25 were prepared for shipment to Moscow, and the remainder was supposed to be left for the local museum of regional studies.

Among the hundreds of exhibits were: woodcuts from the era of Durer Epoch and from the Verrocchio Workshop; paintings by Cignanelli, Lulen Lenteu, and by the Russian artists Prince Grigorii Gagarin, Filippov, Dementiev and many unknown artists; sculptures by S. Kauer and Gaul; glazed pottery from the 17th and 18th centuries; porcelain from Berlin, Saint Petersburg, China, and England; Japanese fine art; marble busts by Adolfo Wildt (1868 -1931); and liturgical implements made of precious metal and stained glass from the 16th to 19th centuries. Among the recovered items were exhibits from Kiev, Dnepropetrovsk and Polish museums.

These artworks also experienced a tragic fate. Having prepared all the necessary documents for transport, A. Brusov consigned 60 boxes of valuables to the military guard at the house of the former Koenigsberg State Archives (now the Regional Research Library). These valuables did not reach their destination. An investigation revealed that they were looted in autumn 1945. The valuables assigned to the local museum were also lost. The detailed contents of these boxes were identified only in 1994. During the immediate post-war months a group from the Committee for Cultural Organization Affairs of the Council of People's Commissars RSFSR headed by T. Beliaeva worked in the destroyed Koenigsberg. The major part of their findings consisted of library collections. Among them were works by Avicenna (an Arabian physician and philosopher of the 11th century), works by Kant, an Indian studies library, the private collection of Dr. Max Hein (one-time director of the Koenigsberg State Archives), antique printed books, the archives of the Old Prussian Don family, and part of the Wallenrodt and Albertina University library.

There were also Gospels, albums, engravings, incunabula, antique prints and catalogues from all Koenigsberg museums, and editions of works by Ovid, Vitruvius, Homer and other ancient authors.

The location of these "trophies" is only partially known. Unique books from the Wallenrodt Library were distributed among libraries in Moscow, Leningrad, Novosibirsk and Voronezh.

The collections of the Koenigsberg Albertina University and its institutions turned out to be in the research library of Voronezh State University. The library of a governmental and military personality that was found by Soviet "fortune hunters" in the summer of 1945 in Waldau (Nizovie) is now located in St Petersburg.

The most prominent cultural valuables were transported from Koenigsberg in 1945 by a brigade of the Committee for Cultural Affairs headed by N. Sergievskaia. In the brigade's reports we may read the following descriptions: "The 17th century. Silver - 21, bronze - 12, china -14, glazed pottery -25, crystal -2, stained glass - 5, marble - 2, paintings - 14, other -21." This type of scientific description of cultural heritage is typical of all the expeditions, group and brigades that worked in post-war Koenigsberg.

Recently a seminar devoted to amber research was held in Kaliningrad. Our colleagues from Poland and Germany stated that there were thousands of unique pieces of amber with inclusions at their disposal. We, living in the area with the largest deposits of amber in the world, could not make similar claims.

Yet a major part of the world-renown Koenigsberg amber collection of the geo-paleontological Albertina Institute was found in summer 1945 by Professor A. Briusov on the Lange Reihe (present day Barnaulskaia Street). This collection was comprised of 110 000 unique amber pieces.

It is perfectly well known, that Karl Andre, the institute's director, managed to transport only 17,000 samples to Gottingen in February 1945. Where are the rest? A. Briusov concisely reported about their destination: "The collection of amber samples from all over the world, one of the best collections of its type, is to be sent to Moscow."

Recent investigations have shown that the amber did not arrive in Moscow, but was looted within the first post-war months in Koenigsberg. A large part of the cultural valuables was transported from Koenigsberg by different trophy teams, by makeshift offices of the State Bank, financial and political departments of military units and formations, by officers of sub-units and commanders of all the levels, and by the first wave of immigrants. Apparently, we will never know their fate.

Many of the valuables are now in private collections, and from time to time they go on sale in antique shops. Pieces of cultural heritage, including those transported to Koenigsberg from occupied regions of the Soviet Union, are still decorating apartments, offices, military headquarters and institutions.

From time to time volumes from the Wollenrodt Library and even canvases from the Dresden Gallery (which also had Koenigsberg connections) are placed on sale in Kaliningrad and in other Russian cities. These include cupid figures from the Koenigsberg Museum of Nature, books from the University Library, statues from parks and palaces, geological and numismatic collections, unique dining sets (including a set from the palace restaurant of Blutgericht) and many more.

Only a tiny part of the above-mentioned happened to be stored in the Kaliningrad Museum of History and Arts. The process of replacement of Koenigsberg artworks is still on-going.

The search for cultural treasures in Koenigsberg and then in Kaliningrad began in April 1945, right after the assault of Koenigsberg, and still goes on, interrupted by short breaks.

Unfortunately, this research has never been a priority for the State. For years it has had the character of ordinary treasure hunting, duplication of efforts, the absence of any coordinating or monitoring body, an accidental choice of exploration sites, poor technical and transport equipment, and also the absence of financial as well as legal grounds.

"Secret" expeditions worked in "secret" Kaliningrad region. Hence, archives that contained information about the transportation and relocation of cultural valuables were not accessible to researchers.

Yet the search for lost valuables continues. Old fortresses, castles, underground shelters, bunkers, and former mansions attract the attention of hunters, as do already unclassified archives, private collections and antique shops in Russia. During the past few years the exhibits of the Koenigsberg Prussia Museum have been found, the location of hundreds of paintings thought to be lost has been identified, the archives of the High Command of the German Army of World War II have been extracted from the cellars and much more has been accomplished.


Translation by O. Zayachkovskaya


Excavations at the Royal Castle site. Photo by D. Vyshemirskii, 2005


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